CES document Plagiarises LGBT Lobbyists



The appalling Catholic Education Service document on homophobic bullying I blogged about here contains material directly lifted from Stonewall. Stonewall is a lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) rights lobby group in the United Kingdom. It is now the largest LGBT pressure group in Europe. It's sole purpose and agenda is to promote homosexuality, a lifestyle at odds with Catholic teaching.

CES DOCUMENT

STONEWALL
This is hugely problematic. You can view the Stonewall website for yourself here and make the comparison - go to page 6 and you will see this is a direct lift https://www.stonewall.org.uk/sites/default/files/getting_started_-_a_toolkit_for_secondary_schools.pdf


CC Father does a good job of highlighting the inconsistencies in the language of the document here.
Asks if there is some sort of link between the CES & Stonewall that we don't know about here.
Notes the plagiarism here.
And makes some important points about academic integrity here.

Fundamentally, we have an organisation which exists to advise & support our Catholic education system peddling subversive material which promotes a lifestyle contradictory to the Catholic faith.

This table highlights the plagiarised sections of the CES document along with the sources:

Made in God’s Image
Catholic Education Service
Educational Resources
Stonewall


Homophobic bullying is bullying that is based on prejudice or negative attitudes, beliefs or views about lesbian, gay or bi people. Homophobic  bullying may be targeted at students who are, or who are perceived to  be, lesbian, gay or bi. It can also suggest that someone or something is less worthy because they are lesbian, gay or bi. Homophobic bullying is also often targeted at students who have lesbian, gay or bi family members, and students who do not conform to gender stereotypes or
are seen to be ‘different’ in some way.
For example:
•a boy repeatedly being called ‘gay’ for holding hands with another
boy
•a girl who reports that she keeps repeatedly being called a ‘lesbian’
and ‘not a real girl’ by other students because she has short hair
•a boy who is picked on for being gay at break-times because he
doesn’t want to play football – ‘He must be gay if he doesn’t like
football’
•a girl who reports that since she came out as a lesbian, other girls in
her class keep moving away from her and giggling every time they’re
in the changing rooms

Biphobic bullying is bullying based on prejudice or negative attitudes, beliefs or views specifically about bisexual people. Biphobic bullying may be targeted at students who are openly bisexual, those who are questioning their sexual orientation, or students who are suspected of being bisexual. Biphobic bullying may target students with negative stereotyping, suggesting or assuming that being bisexual is a phase.
For example:
•a bisexual student receiving ongoing name-calling and jokes about
being ‘greedy’ because they are attracted to boys and girls
•a bisexual student repeatedly being asked probing or intimidating
questions, such as, ‘can’t you make your mind up – do you fancy
boys or girls?’ or ‘why can’t you be normal and just pick boys or
girls?’
Homophobic language  This could be the casual derogatory use of the word ‘gay’ to mean something negative or the use of explicit homophobic terms.
For example:
•‘that’s so gay’, or ‘you’re so gay’; ‘those trainers are so gay’
•someone calling another student a ‘dyke’ or ‘faggot’
Biphobic language
For example:
•shouting ‘bi-bi’
•referring to a bisexual person as ‘greedy’

LAW
Interesting to note here that Stonewall just covers Equality Act and Ofsted…. CED goes further in looking at the Civil Partnership and Marriage Acts. Is there an agenda at play here?

Equality Act 2010
The Equality Act is one of the most important pieces of legislation for
minority groups in the UK. The Act takes all previous equalities legislation
and combines them into one overarching act. All Catholic Schools must
work within the legal obligations laid down in the Equality Act 2010.
The Act protects the rights of people who hold characteristics in one or
more of the following groups:
•Race
•Disability
•Sex
•Age
•Religion
•Sexual orientation
•Pregnancy and maternity
•Gender reassignment
These groups are called ‘protected characteristics’. Below are excerpts
from the act that pertain to schools. Teachers working in the area of
sexual orientation may want to consider some of the statements so as to
be clear on the legislation.

The Equality Act 2010 and Schools
1.7 The Act deals with the way in which schools treat their pupils and
prospective pupils: the relationship between one pupil and another is
not within its scope. It does not therefore bear directly on such issues
as racist or homophobic bullying by pupils. However, if a school treats
bullying which relates to a protected ground less seriously than other
forms of bullying – for example dismissing complaints of homophobic
and biphobic bullying or failing to protect a transgender pupil against
bullying by classmates – then it may be guilty of unlawful discrimination.
Perception
1.11 It is also unlawful to discriminate because of a characteristic which
you think a person has, even if you are mistaken. So a teacher who
consistently picks on a pupil for being gay will be discriminating because
of sexual orientation whether or not the pupil is in fact gay.

Bullying
2.19 The issue of bullying motivated by prejudice is a particularly
sensitive issue. Although the relationship between one pupil and another
is not within the scope of the Act (see paragraph 1.7), schools need to
ensure that all forms of prejudice-motivated bullying are taken seriously
and dealt with equally and firmly.
2.20 The Department for Education has published specific guidance
on bullying including homophobic and transphobic bullying and bullying
related to sexual orientation, transgender, disability, race and religion.
Sexual orientation and marriage and civil partnership
3.24 Schools need to make sure that all gay, lesbian or bi-sexual pupils,
or the children of gay, lesbian or bisexual parents, are not singled out for
different and less favourable treatment from that given to other pupils.
They should check that there are no practices which could result in
unfair, less favourable treatment of such pupils. For example, it would
be unlawful for a school to refuse to let a gay pupil become a prefect
because of his sexual orientation.
3.25 Maintained secondary schools have a legal requirement to teach
about the 'nature of marriage' when they are delivering sex education.
Many academies (including free schools) also teach about this topic,
and when they do so, they must have regard to the Secretary of State’s
guidance on sex and relationship education. Schools must accurately
state the facts about marriage of same sex couples under the law of
England and Wales, in a way that is appropriate to the age and level of
understanding and awareness of the pupils.
3.26 Teaching about marriage must be done in a sensitive, reasonable,
respectful and balanced way. Teachers are subject to professional
requirements, the school curriculum, school policies, and anti-
discrimination duties towards colleagues and pupils.
3.27 No school, or individual teacher, is under a duty to support,
promote or endorse marriage of same sex couples. Teaching should be
based on facts and should enable pupils to develop an understanding of
how the law applies to different relationships. Teachers must have regard
to statutory guidance on sex and relationship education, and to meet
duties under equality and human rights law.
3.28 Sexual orientation and religion or belief
3.29 There is a relationship between protection because of sexual
orientation and protection of religious freedom. Protection in the area of
discrimination on grounds of religion or belief and the right to manifest
one’s religion or belief is set out earlier in this chapter (3.11 – 3.16).
3.30 Many people’s views on sexual orientation and sexual activity are
themselves grounded in religious belief. Some schools with a religious
character have concerns that they may be prevented from teaching in
line with their religious ethos. Teachers have expressed concerns that
they may be subject to legal action if they do not voice positive views
on same-sex relationships, whether or not this view accords with their
faith. There are also concerns that schools with a religious character may
teach and act in ways unacceptable to lesbian, gay and bisexual pupils
and parents when same-sex relationships are discussed because there
are no express provisions to prevent this occurring.
3.31 Schools with a religious character, like all schools, have a
responsibility for the welfare of the children in their care and to
adhere to curriculum guidance. It is not the intention of the Equality
Act to undermine their position as long as they continue to uphold
their responsibilities in these areas. If their beliefs are explained in an
appropriate way in an educational context that takes into account
existing guidance on the delivery of Sex and Relationships Education
(SRE) and Religious Education (RE), then schools should not be acting
unlawfully.
3.32 However, if a school conveyed its belief in a way that involved
haranguing, harassing or berating a particular pupil or group of pupils
then this would be unacceptable in any circumstances and is likely to
constitute unlawful discrimination.
3.33 Where individual teachers are concerned, having a view about
something does not amount to discrimination. So it should not be
unlawful for a teacher in any school to express personal views on sexual
orientation provided that it is done in an appropriate manner and context
(for example when responding to questions from pupils, or in an RE
or Personal, Social, Health and Economic education (PSHE) lesson).
However, it should be remembered that school teachers are in a very
influential position and their actions and responsibilities are bound by
much wider duties than this legislation. A teacher’s ability to express his
or her views should not extend to allowing them to discriminate against
others.


My current school is a strongly Catholic school, with a positive attitude
towards lesbian, gay and bisexual students and their parents, and a
strong anti-bullying position on all issues, including sexuality”.
Pamela, Teacher (Yorkshire and the Humber) (4)


























Defining Homo/Bi/Transexuality




































Homophobic bullying is bullying that is based on prejudice or negative attitudes, beliefs or views about lesbian, gay or bi people. Homophobic bullying may be
targeted at students who are, or who are perceived to be, lesbian, gay or bi. It can also suggest that someone or something is less worthy because they are lesbian, gay or bi. Homophobic bullying is also often targeted at students who have lesbian, gay or bi family members, and students who do not conform to gender stereotypes or
are seen to be ‘different’ in some way.
For example
-a boy repeatedly being called ‘gay’ for holding hands with another boy
– a girl who reports that she keeps repeatedly being called a ‘lesbian’ and ‘not a real girl’ by other students because she has short hair
– a boy who is picked on for being gay at break-times because he doesn’t want to play football – ‘He must be gay if he doesn’t like football’
– a girl who reports that since she came out as a lesbian, other girls in her class keep moving away from her and giggling every time they’re in the changing rooms




Biphobic bullying is bullying based on prejudice or negative attitudes, beliefs or views specifically about bisexual people. Biphobic bullying may be targeted at
students who are openly bisexual, those who are questioning their sexual orientation, or students who are suspected of being bisexual. Biphobic bullying may target students with negative stereotyping (for example suggesting that they are greedy) or assume that being bisexual is a phase.
For example
– a bisexual student receiving ongoing name-calling and jokes about being ‘greedy’ because they are attracted to boys and girls
– a bisexual student repeatedly being asked probing or intimidating questions such as ‘can’t you make your mind up – do you fancy boys or girls?’ or ‘why can’t you be normal and just pick boys or girls?’

Homophobic language This could be the casual derogatory use of the word ‘gay’ to mean something negative or the use of explicit homophobic terms.
For example
– ‘that’s go gay’ or ‘you’re so gay’; ‘those trainers are so gay’
– someone calling another student a ‘dyke’ or ‘faggot’
Biphobic language
For example
– shouting ‘bi-bi’
– referring to a bisexual person as ‘greedy’

LAW




Equality Act 2010
The public sector Equality Duty requires all schools in England to eliminate discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation and gender reassignment.
Schools must promote equality of opportunity and foster good relations. This means doing more than just tackling homophobic, biphobic and transphobic bullying by taking proactive steps to support LGBT pupils, as well as pupils who don’t conform to gender norms, by promoting respect and understanding of LGBT people and issues
across the whole school community. The Department for Education requires all schools to publish information to show how they are complying with this duty. Schools should set and publish specific and measurable equality objectives, for example reducing levels of homophobic, biphobic and transphobic
bullying. The Equality Act 2010 applies gender reassignment to
anyone who is proposing to undergo, is undergoing or
has undergone a process (or part of a process) for the
purpose of reassigning their sex by changing
physiological or other attributes of sex.
This means that schools must protect any pupil taking
steps to reassign their sex, whether those steps are
social (for example changing their name, the pronoun
they prefer and the way they dress or look) or include
medical intervention (for example accessing hormone
therapy or having surgery).

Education and Inspections Act 2006
Schools have a duty to promote the safety and well-being
of all children and young people in their care, including
those who are lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans and those
experiencing homophobic, biphobic or transphobic bullying.

Ofsted
Ofsted inspectors are explicitly directed to look at a
school’s efforts to tackle bullying based on sexual
orientation and gender identity. They may also look at
how the school supports the needs of distinct groups of
pupils, such as lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans pupils or
pupils from LGBT families.








Comments on SRE from A Working with Faith Communities Doc by Stonewall

Children need to be taught to value gay relationships. I worry that there
may be homophobic staff because my school is Catholic and this may have
a negative impact on the children. Amelia, teacher, faith primary school (North West)

Making SRE inclusive of the experiences of lesbian, gay and bisexual people is important not only for young gay people themselves, but for all students.
SRE is about helping pupils understand the society they live in, and preparing them for the realities of adult life. Regardless of sexual orientation or faith, all pupils need to understand that ours is a society in which some families have opposite-sex parents and some have same-sex parents, and that love, marriage, and relationships are
issues that affect everybody, both heterosexual and gay.








































‘My current school is a strongly Catholic school, with a positive attitude
towards lesbian, gay and bisexual students and their parents, and a
strong anti-bullying position on all issues, including sexuality.
Pamela, teacher (Yorkshire and the Humber)


























Defining Homo/Bi/Transexuality

Lesbian refers to a woman who has an emotional, romantic and/or sexual orientation towards women

Gay refers to a man who has an emotional, romantic and/or sexual orientation towards men. Also a generic term for lesbian
and gay sexuality – some women define themselves as gay rather than lesbian

Homosexual This might be considered a more medical term used to describe someone who has an emotional romantic and/or sexual orientation towards someone of the same gender. The term ‘gay’ is now more generally used

Bisexual refers to a person who has an emotional, romantic and/or sexual orientation towards more than one gender

Trans an umbrella term to describe people whose gender is not the same as, or does not sit comfortably with, the sex they were assigned at birth. Trans people may describe themselves using one or more of a wide variety of terms, including (but not limited to) transgender, cross dresser, non-binary, gender queer



Comments

  1. LIke in Ontario - under the militantly pro-homosexual union, the Ontario English Catholic Teacher's Association (OECTA), it seems that Catholic schools in Great Britain are also going hard core pro-homosexual. As I have blogged on a number of occasions, Rainbow flags are displayed in virtually all Catholic schools. The union itself marches openly and officially at the annual "Gay Pride Parade". The official archdiocesan newspaper - The Catholic Register - continues to perpetuate the lie that Catholic education is Catholic. Cardinal Collins is aware of homosexual and heretical infiltration but does nothing.

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  2. I reckon it's laziness rather than anything else that's behind the cut-and-paste from Stonewall: some jobsworth at the CES will have been 'advised' by Stonewall and told to take whatever they want from Stonewall documents. Of course Stonewall just want to help in any way they can. So Lazy McJobsworth at the CES lifts the Stonewall stuff wholesale and plonks it into a 'new' document, adding a few Catholic references and the splendidly anodyne tweets from Francisco I. Lazy McJobsworth pats self on back for a 'comprehensive' document that looks as though s/he actually went to some trouble to get to grips with the issues and expects approval from his/her superiors. The high-ups just give it the nod through ... and it lands on our desks. Small time journalists and local newspapers are famous for this sort of thing -- if you write a press release in the style of an article they'll print it unchanged (useful to know, chaps). A lot of annoying news stories that sound like propaganda are simply press releases rehashed as a story. I suspect Ms Jobsworth at the CES is similarly lazy. Stonewall has form here with press releases, and they'll have guessed that the easiest way to get the CES to say exactly what they want is to give them free rein to copy whatever they like. One of the reasons that evil is often described as banal is because it relies as much (or more) on human weakness (like laziness) as on genuine bad intentions.

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